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The difference between black, blue, green and white mould

What is the Difference between Black Mould, Blue Mould, Green Mould, and White Mould?

What is the difference between black mould, blue mould, green mould and white mould?

There are four different types of mould. In this article, we explain the differences between black mould, blue mould, green mould, and white mould and outline the health risks with each type of mould

How to identify mould

Mould is everywhere. Mould is a type of fungus that grows from tiny spores that float in the air. Mould has the ability to grow almost anywhere that spores happen to land and find where they moisture along with a comfortable temperature, which is between 4 and 38 degrees Celsius. Which means that this includes about every damp place in your home.

The easiest form of mould that can be spotted is the most visible type of mould, called mildew, which are black spots at first, but then they often grow into larger colonies of mould. It’s the black stuff you see in the lines of your shower, outdoors, on damp walls, and on the surfaces of deck boards and painted siding, especially in the shaded, damp areas. A surface that is suffering from mildew is often difficult to distinguish from a dirty one. A way to test if it is mildew rather than just dirt, dab a few drops of bleach to the area. If the area becomes lighter after one to two minutes, it is mildew, if not, it is just dirt.

Mould is a fungus

Mould is a type of fungus. Mould is present almost everywhere, including the air, which means that it can spread easily. Low levels of mould outside will not pose a substantial health risk to you so long as your immune system function is relatively healthy

Black mould is the most common type of mould 

Toxic black mould: known as Stachybotrys chartarum, also known as Stachybotrys atra., is the most common type of mould and is commonly found in residential households. Black mould can release spores as it feeds on plaster, wood, carpet, insulation and a range of other common household building materials.

Toxic black mould can be costly to remove, and black mould exposure and black mould poisoning can cause a wide range of health problems, some of them severe. Understanding black mould symptoms and health effects can help you and your family identify these indicators and take swift action to protect your health and your home.

Black mould is often found inside houses with excessive moisture damage to wallboard and other surfaces. Much is made of this type of mould’s “toxicity” but the mould itself isn’t harmful.

It does, however, have the potential to produce mycotoxins that can cause harm to people and pets, depending on the particular species of mould. A rule of thumb should be “use caution” when removing all moulds, especially when in abundance.

Exposure to black mould does not cause cancer

Despite the common belief that black mould exposure is a serious health concern, exposure to black mould does not cause cancer or lung disease.

There is no scientific evidence to suggest that exposure to S. chartarum (black mould) is more dangerous than exposure to any other type of mould.

However, some people may be more sensitive to mould spores than others, and they may develop respiratory symptoms, poor health, or mental instability after inhaling even a small number of spores. In large quantities, mould spores can cause health problems in almost anyone.

Black mould symptoms and health effects

The most common black mould symptoms and health effects are associated with a respiratory response. Chronic coughing and sneezing, irritation to the eyes, mucous membranes of the nose and throat, rashes, chronic fatigue and persistent headaches can all be symptomatic of black mould exposure or black mould poisoning.

It is important to professionally remove black mould, In particularly severe cases of prolonged exposure, black mould health effects can be more dangerous. Often compounded by allergic reaction to the black mould spores, these symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, and bleeding in the lungs and nose.

White Mould

In damp, cool environments such as basements on structures and the walls, white mould is often present. White mould is often mistaken for mineral deposits created from water seepage, so be sure to check it to see if it really is mould. You can test to see if it’s mould by spraying it with water. If it dissolves, it is a mineral deposit; if it does not, then it’s most likely white mould.

Blue Mould

Blue mould is another common colour of household mould that can appear in damp areas of the home, such as on bathroom walls and ceilings. Due to the moisture created from when you have a shower, blue mould has the perfect environment to thrive in.

The common types of blue mould in a house are Penicillium and Aspergillus. Aspergillus and Penicillium are very common types of mould in houses because most of them do not need a lot of moisture to grow. Blue-green mould is very common on citrus fruits such as oranges.

If the blue mould is growing on non-porous surfaces like metal, glass, bathtubs, toilets, and tile floors and does not cover more than 3 square meters, you can clean it up with household detergent.

Green Mould

Green mould is also very common in houses and like blue mould often appears in damp areas such as on shower walls and damp corners. As with most moulds, green mould can be removed by scrubbing it away with a solution containing bleach.

Thousands of species of green mould blanket our planet. In comparison, hundreds of thousands of mould types of all kinds invisibly meander through the environment. A very large number of species of fungi with greenish-hued spores are referred to as green mould.

Green mould is toxic and poses a health risk

Like all mould, green mould is toxic and poses a health risk to humans. While people breathe mould spores every day, certain conditions provoke mould-related illnesses. People with weakened immune systems are more vulnerable when mould growth occurs indoors. Green moulds, like Aspergillus, can spur the onset of pneumonia and lung inflammation.

Mould can also cause immune system reactions, these reactions may include coughing, runny nose, watery eyes, and itchy skin, in those susceptible to allergies and asthma. Even those with no history of respiratory conditions experience allergy symptoms when inhabiting a space infested with green mould colonies. To make sure that you or your family don’t get sick from green mould, contact us and we will inspect your home and remove the mould for you.

Test for Mould When Seeing Green Indoors

Green mould may be identified by their hue, which is greenish. However, green mould may be difficult to recognize, especially since the green mould may appear in different colours on various surfaces.

Splotches of varying hues of green and green-grey in darkened, damp recesses are a certain indication of green mould. Green mould also commonly grows alongside moulds of varying types, like black or pink mould.

Lots of mould in my house?

If you have a high concentration of mould, you may smell it. If you detect the typical musty odour, check for mould on damp carpets, damp walls, damp crawlspaces and wet wood under your floors, wet roof sheathing and other damp areas. Clean up these infestations right away before they get worse, and see the following photos for prevention measures on how to remove mould.

So which mould is the most dangerous to your health?

Despite the common belief that black mould exposure is a serious health concern, exposure to black mould does not cause cancer or lung disease.

There is no scientific evidence to suggest that exposure to black mould is more dangerous than exposure to any other type of mould.

However, some people may be more sensitive to mould spores than others, and they may develop respiratory symptoms after inhaling even a small number of spores. In large quantities, mould spores can cause health problems for almost all humans.